Today’s international children’s Day

November 20 is universal children’s day. This is a commemorative day initiated by the United Nations. Its purpose is to promote the development of child protection, welfare and education. On December 14, 1954, the general assembly of the United Nations adopted resolution 836 (IX), in which it recommended that all countries establish international children’s day and celebrate it in their own way at an appropriate time each year. On November 20, 1959, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Declaration on the rights of the child. On November 20, 1989, the General Assembly adopted the Convention on the rights of the child. Since 1990, the United Nations has held activities every year on November 20 to mark the international children’s day and the adoption of the two documents.
As of December 2008, 193 States had signed and ratified the Convention. In 1954 (resolution 836 (IX)), the general assembly of the United Nations recommended that all countries establish international children’s day. It is hoped that activities will be held on this day to enhance children’s understanding and establish a wide range of friendship; and activities will be carried out to promote the welfare of children all over the world. The assembly also recommended that governments choose appropriate days to commemorate children’s day. November 20 is a day to commemorate the adoption of the Declaration on the rights of the child by the general assembly in 1959 and the adoption of the Convention on the rights of the child in 1989. In 2000, world leaders proposed the Millennium Development Goals – halving the proportion of people living in extreme poverty, halting the spread of HIV / AIDS to universal primary education, all of which are to be completed by 2015 – for all human beings, but mainly for children. The United Nations Children’s development fund has noted that six of the eight goals are directly related to children, and the realization of the last two will also bring important changes to their lives.